Feb
1
Sat
2020 CHINESE NEW YEAR FESTIVAL
Sat Feb 01 2020 11:00 am — 4:00 pm

The Chinese New Year Festival planned for Saturday at NorthPark has been postponed. Please see the statement below:

Mindful of the current and evolving health crisis in China, and aligned with other communities across the nation, the Crow Museum of Asian Art of The University of Texas at Dallas and NorthPark Center have decided to postpone the planned celebrations for Saturday’s Chinese New Year Festival.

Our goal has always been to deliver a wonderfully inclusive, family-friendly event that showcases and elevates Asian cultures. We look forward to collaborating on future festivals that will be enjoyed by visitors from North Texas and beyond.

Thank you to all of our Chinese New Year Host Committee, NorthPark Center, and our Crow supporters and friends.

Join us at NorthPark Center for the Crow Museum’s 21st annual Chinese New Year Festival, celebrating The Year of the Rat!

 

The first of all of the zodiac animals, the rat can represent wealth and prosperity, and symbolize the beginning of a new day.

This marks the third year that the beloved festival will be held indoors at NorthPark Center, where it continues to thrive and attract record-breaking crowds. Fun for all ages, the signature event will feature stunning dragon and lion dances, musical and martial-arts demos, art making and calligraphy, specialty booths, vibrant entertainment and cultural performances. In addition, NorthPark Center will offer Chinese New Year retailer specials and giveaways (including NorthPark Gold) and inspired landscaping throughout the shopping center. A special Chinese New Year-inspired exhibition will also be on view on Level One between Burberry and Louis Vuitton through March 1.

11AM-4PM
Throughout NorthPark Center

PERFORMANCES IN NORTHCOURT
11AM — Rising Phoenix Lion Dance Association TX: Drum Roll
11:15AM — Ceremonial Welcome
11:30AM — Rising Phoenix Lion Dance Association: Acrobatic Lion Dance
12:15PM—HuaYun Chinese Orchestra: Traditional and Folk Chinese New Year Music
1PM — Jasmine Chinese Dance Troupe
1:45PM —Thomas Gu: Diabolo, Chinese Yo-Yo
2:15PM— Richardson Symphony Orchestra: New Year Music
2:45PM—Yucheng Chen: Guzheng, Chinese Harp
3:20PM—Julia Zhu: Bian Lian
3:30PM — Lee’s White Leopard Kung Fu School‘s Lion Dance and Dragon Dance

Activities throughout the shopping center:

Roaming Lion Dance
Keep an eye out for lions as they roam throughout NorthPark to help bring luck and happiness to the new year. Lions provided by Lee’s White Leopard Kung Fu School.

Special Offers from NorthPark Retailers
Look for red and gold balloons signifying participating retailers.

Auspicious Face Painting
Have lucky symbols, such as lanterns, dragons, and flowers, painted on your cheek.

Chinese Lion Photo Booth
Snap a photo with lion dance costume heads from Lee’s White Leopard Kung Fu School and post to social media using #CrowCNY.

Zodiac Art Activity
The order of the 12 zodiac animals is said to be based off a
great race held long ago. The rat was the first to cross the
finish line, making it the first animal in the zodiac. Why do
you think the rat came in first? Draw your own animal race,
dreaming up your own version of his quick finish.

The Wishing Tree
In Hong Kong, people write wishes for the New Year and hang them on trees with oranges. Experience an art installtion inspired by this tradition, and add your wish to it. Don’t forget to snap a picture and use #CrowCNY!

LEGO Building Station
Help create a Chinese New Year masterpiece with official LEGO building kits to celebrate the Year of the Rat.

Chinese Brush Painting
The tradition of brush and ink painting in China goes back thousands of years. Today, many artists keep this tradition alive using both old and new techniques. Come see for yourself as painter Carle Shi creates works of her own.

Chinese Paper Cutting
One popular way to decorate for Chinese New Year is cutting characters and imagery from red paper to hang in windows. Visit artist Li Lui to see the beautiful complexity of Chinese paper cutting being made in person.

Chinese Calligraphy
Calligraphy, the Greek word for beautiful writing, has been considered the supreme art form in China as far back as the Han Dynasty (206 BCE-220 AD). See this visual artistry take shape with a local master calligrapher.

Chinese Yo-Yo (Diabolo)
Yo-yos are believed to have originally come from China, and since then many different versions and surges in popularity have followed. Learn how to “juggle” a Chinese yo-yo, also known as a diabolo, with the Dallas Chinese Community Center.

Noodle Pulling (La Mian)
Oodles of noodles are an important ingredient in a Chinese New Year spread, especially longevity noodles that are said to bring good luck and a long life. Chef Andrew Chen of Monkey King Noodle Co. will give a brief overview on the history and significance of noodles in China and also offer up a noodle pulling demo and samplings.

Instrument and Music Station
Try your hand with traditional Asian cultural instruments from several different countries that are used to help usher in the new year. Volunteers will be available to discuss and instruct how to play these unique and culturally significant pieces.

Year of the Rat – Rat Ear Making
Regardless of your zodiac animal, we can all celebrate the Year of the Rat with your own whiskered mask.

Lotus Shop Pop Up
Come browse the satellite Lotus Shop for a unique selection of souvenirs and gifts. Don’t forget to pick up some limited edition Year of the Rat apparel because it is lucky to wear new clothes for the New Year.

Lucky Red Envelopes
Lucky Red Envelopes are a must for celebrating Chinese New Year. Adorn your own and feed it to the lions dancing around the Center and on the main stage.

 

With generous support from NorthPark Center, The University of Texas at Dallas, and the Chinese New Year Host Committee.

 

NP_The_Art_of_Shopping_PMS_C

 

Feb
20
Thu
Asia Now: Curated Conversation on Art, Life, and Asia in the World
Thu Feb 20 2020 6:00 pm — 8:00 pm

 

Asia Now: Curated Conversations on Art, Life and Asia in the World

A Vision for Asia

Thursday, February 20, 2020

6-8 PM

6:30 PM Panel Discussion

 

Asia Now: Curated Conversations on Art, Life, and Asia in the World is a new program series designed to promote thoughtful dialogue with guest speakers and engaging topics.

 

The Crow Museum Meets University: Our Future as a University Art Museum
This program, conversationally sparked by leaders in the field will explore the Crow Museum’s transition into a new and sustainable future as a University Art Museum. Moderated by Amy Lewis Hofland, the panel will present the state of Asian Art and collecting in North Texas and why Asia matters in our region.

Speakers:        

Dr. Dennis Kratz, Ignacy and Celina Rockover Professor of Humanities and Founding Director of the Center for Asian Studies, The University of Texas at Dallas

Dr. Richard Brettell, Margaret M. McDermott Distinguished Chair of Art and Aesthetic Studies and Edith O’Donnell Distinguished University Chair, The University of Texas at Dallas

Dr. Jacqueline Chao, Senior Curator, Crow Museum of Asian Art of The University of Texas at Dallas

 

Moderator:

Amy Lewis Hofland, Senior Director, Crow Museum of Asian Art of The University of Texas at Dallas

 

Space is limited; RSVP to rsvp@crowmuseum.org

Mar
12
Thu
POSTPONED: Panel Discussion: Art, Refugee Policy, Human Rights
Thu Mar 12 2020 2:00 pm — 3:30 pm

 

 

 

This event has been postponed to a later date to be determined. Please contact 972-883-5256 with any questions.

 

A discussion of the intersections between art, refugee policy, and human rights with distinguished artist and professor, Beili Liu. Panel conversation and Q&A to follow.

Presenters:
Beili Liu, Artist and Professor of Art, University of Texas at Austin
Dr. Rebecca Cordell, School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences
Ashley Faye, Refugee Services Texas

Partners:
Crow Museum of Asian Art of the University of Texas at Dallas
Refugee Services Texas
School of Economic, Political and Policy Sciences
School of Arts and Humanities
School of Arts, Technology, and Emerging Communication
Edith O’Donnell Institute of Art History
Center for Asian Studies

 

Open to the public.

POSTPONED: Beili Liu In-Gallery Performance and Artist Conversation with Beili Liu and Aram Han Sifuentes
Thu Mar 12 2020 6:00 pm — 8:00 pm

 

 

THIS EVENT HAS BEEN POSTPONED TO A LATER DATE TO BE DETERMINED.

 

Please call 972-883-5256 or email rsvp@crowmuseum.org with any questions or concerns. Thank you for your understanding.

 

 

Beili Liu In-Gallery Performance for Each and Every/Dallas on Mezzanine from 6:00-6:30 PM

On the occasion of the launch of the Museum’s Texas Asian Women Artist series and inaugural opening exhibition Beili Liu: One And Another, and in conjunction with her installation Each and Every/Dallas, Austin-based visual artist Beili Liu incorporates a performance in which she sits in protest alongside the installation in silent meditation, mending worn articles of brightly-colored clothing, and using the repetitive act of mending cloth to explore cultural ideas of feminine labor, healing and hope. As an artist, mother and immigrant, the installation and corresponding performance piece was conceptualized in response to the migrant children crisis and the separation of migrant children from their parents at the southern border of the United States.

 

Artist Conversation in Grand Gallery at 7 PM

Asia Now: Curated Conversations on Art, Life and Asia in the World

Beili Liu and Aram Han Sifuentes

 

On the occasion of the launch of the Museum’s Texas Asian Women Artist series and inaugural opening exhibition Beili Liu: One And Another, Austin-based visual artist Beili Liu and Chicago-based fiber and performance artist Aram Han Sifuentes will both speak and provide unique insight into their work, influences, and practices.  Moderated by Janeil Engelstad, Founding Director of Make Art with Purpose (MAP), this conversation is part of the festival MAP2020: The Further We Roll, The More We Gain, which commemorates the 100th anniversary of the Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution with art and public programs throughout Dallas and Fort Worth, including at the Crow Museum of Asian Art. This conversation will explore how the artists address the themes of migration, immigration, motherhood and identity in their work and invite participation from the audience.

 

About the Artists:

 

Beili Liu is a visual artist who creates material and process-driven, site-responsive installations. Working with commonplace materials and elements such as thread, scissors, paper, stone, fire, and water, Liu manipulates their intrinsic qualities to extrapolate complex cultural narratives. Liu’s work has been exhibited in Asia, Europe, and across the United States. She has held solo exhibitions at venues such as the Ha Gamle Prestegard, Norwegian National Art and Culture Center; Hua Gallery, London, UK; and the Chinese Culture Foundation in San Francisco. Liu has been awarded the 2016 Joan Mitchell Painters and Sculptors Grant, and named the 2018 Texas State Artist in 3D medium by the Texas State Legislature and the Texas Commission on the Arts. Liu’s work has received support from the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation Artistic Innovation and Collaboration Grant (Women and Their Work, 2013) and the National Endowment for the Arts (Museum of Southeast Texas, 2014).

 

Born in Jilin, China, Liu now lives and works in Austin, Texas. She received her MFA from The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and is currently a Professor of Art at The University of Texas at Austin.

 

Aram Han Sifuentes is a fiber and performance artist who works to claim spaces for immigrant and disenfranchised communities. Her work often revolves around skill sharing, specifically sewing techniques, to create multiethnic and intergenerational sewing circles, which become a place for empowerment, subversion and protest. Solo exhibitions of her work have been exhibited at Jane Addams Hull-House Museum (Chicago, IL), Hyde Park Art Center (Chicago, IL), Chicago Cultural Center (Chicago, IL), Asian Arts Initiative (Philadelphia, PA), Table Art Center (Charleston, IL), University Galleries at Illinois State University (Normal, IL), and Pulitzer Arts Foundation (St. Louis, MO). Her solo exhibition, Talking Back To Power, will be on exhibit at the Skirball Cultural Center (Los Angeles, CA) October 2020 to March 2021.

 

Aram is a 2016 Smithsonian Artist Research Fellow, 2016 3Arts Awardee, and 2017 Sustainable Arts Foundation Awardee. Her project Protest Banner Lending Library was a finalist for the Beazley Design Awards at the Design Museum (London, UK) in 2016. She earned her BA in Art and Latin American Studies from the University of California, Berkeley, and her MFA in Fiber and Material Studies from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. She is currently an Adjunct Associate Professor at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Mar
13
Fri
POSTPONED: Beili Liu: In-Gallery Performance for Each and Every/Dallas
Fri Mar 13 2020 12:00 pm — 1:00 pm

 

 

This event has been postponed until a later date. Please call 972-883-5256 with questions.

On the occasion of the launch of the Museum’s Texas Asian Women Artist series and inaugural opening exhibition Beili Liu: One And Another, and in conjunction with her installation Each and Every/Dallas, Austin-based visual artist Beili Liu incorporates a performance in which she sits in protest alongside the installation in silent meditation, mending worn articles of brightly-colored clothing, and using the repetitive act of mending cloth to explore cultural ideas of feminine labor, healing and hope. As an artist, mother and immigrant, the installation and corresponding performance piece was conceptualized in response to the migrant children crisis and the separation of migrant children from their parents at the southern border of the United States.

 

Free and open to the public.

Apr
3
Fri
POSTPONED: SOLUNA: WINDOWS TO YUSHU
Fri Apr 03 2020 8:00 pm — 10:00 pm

 

This event has been postponed to a yet to be determined later date.

DU YUN
OK MISS
JULIAN CROUCH

 

Due to its unique geography and centuries of social strife, the Yushu Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture has become one of the most isolated areas of the world. Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Du Yun explores the lasting effects on the children who have grown up in this secluded corner of the world that has changed little in hundreds of years. Seeking the parallels between traditional and contemporary art and between different media, Du Yun and director Julian Crouch are working with first-generation students and community members from Tibet to build a technological window to other parts of the world and explore points of connection among cultural heritages and geographies. This performance will include a preview of Du Yun’s new music featuring her band OK Miss, demonstrate Julian’s design concepts, and show clips from an upcoming documentary film on the project.

 

“At first glance, the one predictable thing about Du Yun, the Pulitzer Prize-winning composer, performer, and multimedia artist, is her unpredictability. Dig deeper, though, and you can sense the conjoined strands of curiosity and compassion that run through everything she makes.” – The New Yorker

 

BUY – mydso.com/SOLUNA